Salt Smarts

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  1. Health Trumps Convenience: Avoid packaged convenience foods because they often have salt as a preservative. Cook for yourself so you know how much salt has been added.
  2. Salty Sides: Make homemade brown rice or baked potatoes instead of the packaged instant potatoes or flavored rice/noodles. The salt content in these is way over the recommended daily allowance.
  3. Read The Label: Always read the food label for sodium. Watch for alternate products that say “sodium-free,” “low sodium,” or “no salt.”
  4. Salty Seasonings: Use salty seasonings such as broth, soy sauce, bouillon, seasoned salts, and condiments sparingly. They are all produced to be very high in salt.
  5. Control The Salt: Remember you can always add more salt. There is no great way to take it back out.
  6. Additive Advice: MSG, baking soda, and baking powder all include sodium. You may not be able to cut these out altogether, but be careful of adding additional salt to products that contain them.
  7. Trade Time: If a recipe calls for salt, choose something healthier. Try spices such as rosemary, thyme, tarragon, onion and garlic powder, pepper, and even combinations. If you don’t trust your novice taste buds, sprinkle in a salt-free seasoning from the store.
  8. Crazy Canning: Salt is often added to canned vegetables. Go healthier by using only fresh, frozen, or salt-free canned veggies.
  9. Rinse The Veggies: If you can’t find low- or no-salt canned veggies, drain and rinse them before cooking. This will remove a large portion of the salt.
  10. Magical Marinades: Rather than using salty condiments to marinate meat before grilling, try a citrus juice. Orange and pineapple juice can be used as a delicious base for a meat marinade.
  11. Make The Break: Out of sight, out of mind. The best way to cut down on salt is to not have it stocked in your kitchen.
  12. Low Fat, High Sodium: Foods labeled as low fat can have high sodium content. The trade-off of fat and calories may mean too much salt in your diet. Read labels carefully!
  13. Super Seaweed: When cooking beans, add a bit of dried seaweed (kombu or wakame) as a substitute for salt. It adds a delicious salty flavor that is lower in sodium and higher in iodine.
  14. Frozen Frequency: When looking for frozen dinners, watch out for high sodium. Choose those that have 600 milligrams of sodium per serving or less. Restrict yourself to only one frozen entree daily.

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